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curtpires:

keaneoncomics:

Phonogram: Rue Britannia #1-6 
Song: Kieron Gillen / Lyrics: Jamie McKelvie

Re-read this recently. Even better than I remembered.

“I! FUCKING! HATE! KULA! SHAKER!”

This is fucking amazing. Music = Magic, people. 

(Source: caustica, via curtpires)

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(Source: saintksu)

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natashavc:

legit

BenecioQuest

natashavc:

legit

BenecioQuest

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natashavc:

(via iwdrm)

natashavc:

(via iwdrm)

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Bloc Party -Little Thoughts

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bohemea:

Natalie Dormer in Game of Thrones
Some of the season 2 costumes are blowing my mind! They’re positively McQueen’esque!

bohemea:

Natalie Dormer in Game of Thrones

Some of the season 2 costumes are blowing my mind! They’re positively McQueen’esque!

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heyoscarwilde:

James Bond Redesigned

illustrations by Owain Wilson :: via owainwilson

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Let’s talk Walking Dead. One more time.
And this time? Still about the faults, but I will say the show ends on a resoundingly positive note for me. I’ll try to reserve the backhanded compliments, if possible. I’ll try to rein in the faults with the show from contaminating the successful last two episodes. These last two have pretty much redeemed the show for me.
Mainly, the strength of this one-two closer punch was the fact that it finally put this season in the earth. Good riddance. This is an opinion that I didn’t form myself, but I almost entirely agree with: the whole of season 2 could’ve been shortened by a good several episodes, possibly by half.
In summary, the problems:
No one really cared about the Sophia plot. She was never a character, just a plot device. But the worst offender was the Shane-Lori-Rick arc. God awful. Not because it was implausible; not because it was unreasonable; but simply, due to the constraints of this genre-show (zombie survival), and the fact that when put together, none of these three are sympathetic enough for us to care about them, it drags the entire show down.
Other things like the show not knowing what to do with T-Dog, almost like they forgot to kill him off last season or is possibly bait for the return of Merle; the show’s writers almost teasing us with the gruesome and utterly satisfying death of Carl, but never delivering; Andrea’s mismatched and shortsighted slot-in as A Strong Woman Figure Who Emphasizes Feminine Strength by Becoming A Man.
Sometimes, I don’t feel like I give this show enough credit. But other times, I’m astounded by the insane critical reception it receives. I’d like to temper both sides and simply say that I am on board for season 3, but it has to pick up the slack.

Let’s talk Walking Dead. One more time.

And this time? Still about the faults, but I will say the show ends on a resoundingly positive note for me. I’ll try to reserve the backhanded compliments, if possible. I’ll try to rein in the faults with the show from contaminating the successful last two episodes. These last two have pretty much redeemed the show for me.

Mainly, the strength of this one-two closer punch was the fact that it finally put this season in the earth. Good riddance. This is an opinion that I didn’t form myself, but I almost entirely agree with: the whole of season 2 could’ve been shortened by a good several episodes, possibly by half.

In summary, the problems:

No one really cared about the Sophia plot. She was never a character, just a plot device. But the worst offender was the Shane-Lori-Rick arc. God awful. Not because it was implausible; not because it was unreasonable; but simply, due to the constraints of this genre-show (zombie survival), and the fact that when put together, none of these three are sympathetic enough for us to care about them, it drags the entire show down.

Other things like the show not knowing what to do with T-Dog, almost like they forgot to kill him off last season or is possibly bait for the return of Merle; the show’s writers almost teasing us with the gruesome and utterly satisfying death of Carl, but never delivering; Andrea’s mismatched and shortsighted slot-in as A Strong Woman Figure Who Emphasizes Feminine Strength by Becoming A Man.

Sometimes, I don’t feel like I give this show enough credit. But other times, I’m astounded by the insane critical reception it receives. I’d like to temper both sides and simply say that I am on board for season 3, but it has to pick up the slack.

Photo
bohemea:

Be Megan Draper
Mad Men finally returns to us after an agonizing 17 month hiatus & it proved what we all suspected: well worth the wait.
The episode, directed by Jennifer Getzinger (who also directed the wonderful season 3 episode “The Gypsy and the Hobo” & the epic season 4 episode “The Suitcase”), begins Memorial day weekend, 1966. Don & Megan are married, and Megan is proving to be the perfect woman. She sleeps naked, sips black coffee for breakfast, flashes her husband at work, works hard and throws smokey parties with endless liquor, a live band and a sultry performance of Gillian Hills’ “Zou Bisou Bisou” (which was also performed by Sophia Loren in The Millionairess) in her impeccably decorated apartment.  Plus she looks like Snow White to Betty’s Cinderella. Those Draper children may have a lot of baggage, but every time they look at their parents or step-mother, they’re looking at a cartoon character come to life. I bet they think song birds are actually capable of landing on Megan’s finger after she purses her singer’s mouth lips together and whistles a happy tune.
I think I’m in love with her. I want to lie on white rugs with Megan while she wears sheer panties & teaches me French; everyone wants this. Everyone looks at what Don has and wonders if she’s the answer to all life’s problems, and it seems like, for the time being, she is. Don adores his sweetly seductive wife who plays naughty domestic games with him, but also allows him to stroke her like a kitten afterwards and assure her that her happiness is his own. His want for Megan is physical, but it’s a need; to observe her, play with her, smile and admire the lightness that has finally invaded his dim world. Megan is all the sweet acceptance of Anna with the cruel dark sensuality that Don craves. Like Anna, Megan loves Dick Whitman; like Betty, Megan is gorgeous & girlish; like all those other women who Don has grasped and who have grasped him back, who slapped, glared, shouted, gasped & clutched, Megan pleases Don. Megan is what Don/Dick feels he always needed.
Despite domestic hiccups that can currently be cured with power play sex games, Don is happy. You never see an inappropriate drink in Don’s hand. Don is playful with his children. Don is happy to arrive late to work, pretty wife on his arm, spend his day working a bit and return home to that simple, sprawling, gorgeous home. What’s worrisome is that this is going to affect Don’s work, as we saw in Don’s brief distracted appearance during Peggy and Stan’s Heinz presentation. In many ways Don is good at his job because he’s unhappy. He wasn’t a good husband, he wasn’t the best full-time father, he was a terrible boyfriend, but he was fantastic at his job. Now Peggy & all of us wonder: if Don is happy at home, will his work suffer; and if it does, is that bad?
The theme of the episode seemed to be Sad Old Men & the Women Who Love Them. We see each man in one way or another dissatisfied, in spite of their enviable achievements. Harry is the very picture of the man who married too young & now aches for a misspent youth. Pete returns home to his loving wife, healthy daughter & expansive home pining for his Brunette Barbie wife prettily decorated in a crinoline & curls in their darling city apartment, a roast waiting for consumption or to be tossed from the balcony, a drink freshly poured, everything in order, nothing busy, nothing so far from the life he lives all day; his home is suddenly the foreign place. Lane, back together with his wife, in New York where he fought so hard to stay, miserable, full of such an awkward lust that it makes one cringe to observe.  As always, Roger watches Don effortlessly gain a duplicate of what Roger thought he had. “Why don’t you sing like that?” Roger asks his icily beautiful wife who was once his sweet eager young secretary. “Why don’t you look like him?” she fires back. Jane never was Megan. Roger will never have what Don has: not in business & not at home. Only Kenny seems well-adjusted, which I believe has been a theme throughout the entire series.
So we’re back to sex and dissatisfaction and a time period that’s perfect for telling the tale because amongst all these privileged beautiful people leading terribly discontent lives, true discontent exists in the world. “I thought there were going to be girls here”, the sailor laments while Peggy’s boyfriend, Roger & Stan are locked in a debate that concerns none of them directly. All they have to do is have an opinion, sit back with a drink rested on round well-fed bellies, and observe the world fall apart around them while they complain that they can’t find a woman to act out a Sophia Loren dance number for them on their birthday. But isn’t this a hopelessly unanswerable question? At what point do we stop complaining about what we’re not willing to change and, at the very least, learn to be happy with what we have? When do we stop and enjoy surprise birthday parties, handsome mates and impractical white rugs? 

bohemea:

Be Megan Draper

Mad Men finally returns to us after an agonizing 17 month hiatus & it proved what we all suspected: well worth the wait.

The episode, directed by Jennifer Getzinger (who also directed the wonderful season 3 episode “The Gypsy and the Hobo” & the epic season 4 episode “The Suitcase”), begins Memorial day weekend, 1966. Don & Megan are married, and Megan is proving to be the perfect woman. She sleeps naked, sips black coffee for breakfast, flashes her husband at work, works hard and throws smokey parties with endless liquor, a live band and a sultry performance of Gillian Hills’ “Zou Bisou Bisou” (which was also performed by Sophia Loren in The Millionairess) in her impeccably decorated apartment.  Plus she looks like Snow White to Betty’s Cinderella. Those Draper children may have a lot of baggage, but every time they look at their parents or step-mother, they’re looking at a cartoon character come to life. I bet they think song birds are actually capable of landing on Megan’s finger after she purses her singer’s mouth lips together and whistles a happy tune.

I think I’m in love with her. I want to lie on white rugs with Megan while she wears sheer panties & teaches me French; everyone wants this. Everyone looks at what Don has and wonders if she’s the answer to all life’s problems, and it seems like, for the time being, she is. Don adores his sweetly seductive wife who plays naughty domestic games with him, but also allows him to stroke her like a kitten afterwards and assure her that her happiness is his own. His want for Megan is physical, but it’s a need; to observe her, play with her, smile and admire the lightness that has finally invaded his dim world. Megan is all the sweet acceptance of Anna with the cruel dark sensuality that Don craves. Like Anna, Megan loves Dick Whitman; like Betty, Megan is gorgeous & girlish; like all those other women who Don has grasped and who have grasped him back, who slapped, glared, shouted, gasped & clutched, Megan pleases Don. Megan is what Don/Dick feels he always needed.

Despite domestic hiccups that can currently be cured with power play sex games, Don is happy. You never see an inappropriate drink in Don’s hand. Don is playful with his children. Don is happy to arrive late to work, pretty wife on his arm, spend his day working a bit and return home to that simple, sprawling, gorgeous home. What’s worrisome is that this is going to affect Don’s work, as we saw in Don’s brief distracted appearance during Peggy and Stan’s Heinz presentation. In many ways Don is good at his job because he’s unhappy. He wasn’t a good husband, he wasn’t the best full-time father, he was a terrible boyfriend, but he was fantastic at his job. Now Peggy & all of us wonder: if Don is happy at home, will his work suffer; and if it does, is that bad?

The theme of the episode seemed to be Sad Old Men & the Women Who Love Them. We see each man in one way or another dissatisfied, in spite of their enviable achievements. Harry is the very picture of the man who married too young & now aches for a misspent youth. Pete returns home to his loving wife, healthy daughter & expansive home pining for his Brunette Barbie wife prettily decorated in a crinoline & curls in their darling city apartment, a roast waiting for consumption or to be tossed from the balcony, a drink freshly poured, everything in order, nothing busy, nothing so far from the life he lives all day; his home is suddenly the foreign place. Lane, back together with his wife, in New York where he fought so hard to stay, miserable, full of such an awkward lust that it makes one cringe to observe.  As always, Roger watches Don effortlessly gain a duplicate of what Roger thought he had. “Why don’t you sing like that?” Roger asks his icily beautiful wife who was once his sweet eager young secretary. “Why don’t you look like him?” she fires back. Jane never was Megan. Roger will never have what Don has: not in business & not at home. Only Kenny seems well-adjusted, which I believe has been a theme throughout the entire series.

So we’re back to sex and dissatisfaction and a time period that’s perfect for telling the tale because amongst all these privileged beautiful people leading terribly discontent lives, true discontent exists in the world. “I thought there were going to be girls here”, the sailor laments while Peggy’s boyfriend, Roger & Stan are locked in a debate that concerns none of them directly. All they have to do is have an opinion, sit back with a drink rested on round well-fed bellies, and observe the world fall apart around them while they complain that they can’t find a woman to act out a Sophia Loren dance number for them on their birthday. But isn’t this a hopelessly unanswerable question? At what point do we stop complaining about what we’re not willing to change and, at the very least, learn to be happy with what we have? When do we stop and enjoy surprise birthday parties, handsome mates and impractical white rugs? 

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"I had an important dream today."
Quote
"I had a (great) dream today."
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Bloc Party -Tulips

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MAD MEN: THE GAME

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natashavc:

Otters who look like Benedict Cumberbatch
(via)

natashavc:

Otters who look like Benedict Cumberbatch

(via)